Tag Archive: hackers

  1. Facial Recognition & Cybersecurity

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    Human beings are uniquely adept at recognizing faces and interpreting facial expressions. The average person is capable of remembering and recognizing over 5,000 unique faces instantly. We’re so good at it that we can immediately spot a familiar person up to 50 yards away. For a machine to step up to the task of recognizing faces that quickly and reliably would be quite a feat of engineering. But, of course, facial recognition technology (FR) has made some critical leaps forward in recent years.

    For FR to work, it has to go through a process of capturing images, extracting key feature markers, comparing these to a database, and performing a match search. At present, facial recognition security assets require that a would-be entrant present his or her face to the scanner, hold still for a moment, and try not to visibly emote. This kind of tech can help harden an access point against unauthorized entrants- but the limitations of the system make it easy for clever hackers to defeat.

    Here at Integrated Axis Technology Group in Arizona, our goal is to help you get the most out of any security technology you choose to deploy. At present, recognizing the cybersecurity risks of Facial Recognition is critical.

    The Risks of Facial Recognition Technology

    The best FR tech performs Capture, Extraction, Comparison, and Matching very quickly. But for an intruder who understands how the machine works, defeating the system is still possible. There is also a list of known methods to beat FR cameras. They include, but are not limited to;

    • Camera finders: detect FR cameras so they can be avoided
    • NIR LEDs: use bright lights to disrupt FR scans
    • Reflective accessories: blind camera sensors
    • Prosthetic masks: realistic masks that can trick FR cameras
    • Hair and makeup: obscure and alter facial features without looking suspicious

    FR Hacking

    For the time being, all of these methods allow people to escape detection. But only one can actually fool an FR scanner in order to gain access to a restricted location, the prosthetic mask. While these items are expensive, it is possible for a criminal to obtain them, and they easily fool most FR systems. Of course, privacy is always a concern. By making your face your key and password, that means anyone who manages to obtain a prosthetic copy of your face gains access. In a world where FR is ubiquitous, a rise in prosthetic mask crime is a predictable outcome.

    Reliability

    Automakers have begun experimenting with FR tech as a means for drivers to access their vehicles. Models that are currently in testing have a high rate of success, about 97%. But these devices succeed at lower rates recognizing women due to makeup and hair changes, and people with dark skin, which absorbs much of the light FR systems need to work.

    Privacy

    Of course, placing FR cameras anywhere poses a privacy threat to anyone who walks by them. With these concerns on the rise, we can expect to see changes to legislation regulating these devices in the near future.

    Here at Integrated Axis, our goal is to help companies in Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona cope with and overcome these risks. Our integrated It services are designed to keep you ahead of the competition- especially in areas where keeping up with bleeding-edge technology is key to remaining competitive in your industry.

  2. Windows 7 Is Ending

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    Windows 7 has been one of the most popular operating systems Microsoft has ever produced. It’s so popular that many people still use it to this day. Sadly, The Microsoft company announced earlier this year that it is ending Windows 7 support next year in January 2020. This has important implications for those who may or may not intend to keep using it in the new year.

    Everything You Need to Know About the Windows 10 Changeover:

    Windows 7 is Still Popular

    What Microsoft calls “end of life” doesn’t mean that laptops and desktops running Windows 7 will suddenly die. It only means that the company will no longer be providing active support and updates for the OS. If you are one of the many people who want to hold on to your copy of Windows 7, there are a few potential IT issues you should keep in mind. First and foremost is the fact that you won’t get important patches that protect your system from the latest viruses and malware. That means your cybersecurity could be compromised.

    Cybersecurity Issues

    Black hat hackers always focus their efforts on creating malware and attacks that exploit the most commonly used systems. Because Windows 7 has been so popular- it has always been a common target. Once the security patches stop coming, you’ll no longer be protected. Those who want to keep the OS should consider using it on machines that are no longer connected to the Internet. Keeping it quarantined from the Internet can protect you from security threats and allow you to use it for certain business tech applications or other special projects.

    Are All Versions Affected?

    Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter whether you’re using Windows 7 Pro or Home version- the end of life will still affect you. However, Microsoft has not yet announced “end of life” for Windows 7 Ultimate for Embedded Systems. If you’re using that one, you will be able to continue using it for the time being.

    How to Make the Changeover

    Eventually, you will have to transition no matter what. The next generations of Windows PCs are going to come with Windows 10 pre-loaded. There won’t be an option to return to Windows 7. If you’re not bothered by the change, you’ll be glad to know that Microsoft intends to make the process of switching to 10 easy. As long as your machine meets the minimum requirements, you’ll have the option to upgrade from 7 to 10.

    About Windows 10

    Windows 10 will come with a host of features not available on 7. Many of these are intended to make the perceived barriers between online and offline use less apparent. You’ll be presented with services and options through the main menu that will take you directly to online resources without having to open your browser directly.

    To run Windows 10, you’ll need:

    • A 1GHz or better processor
    • 1GB of RAM for 32-bit ver.
    • 2GB of RAM for 64-bit ver.
    • Up to 20GB of hard disk space
    • Screen and graphics card supporting 800 by 600 or higher, and a DirectX 9 graphics chip
    • Access to the Internet

    To learn more, get in touch today with Integrated Axis Technology Group. We can help make the transition easy.