Human beings are uniquely adept at recognizing faces and interpreting facial expressions. The average person is capable of remembering and recognizing over 5,000 unique faces instantly. We’re so good at it that we can immediately spot a familiar person up to 50 yards away. For a machine to step up to the task of recognizing faces that quickly and reliably would be quite a feat of engineering. But, of course, facial recognition technology (FR) has made some critical leaps forward in recent years.

For FR to work, it has to go through a process of capturing images, extracting key feature markers, comparing these to a database, and performing a match search. At present, facial recognition security assets require that a would-be entrant present his or her face to the scanner, hold still for a moment, and try not to visibly emote. This kind of tech can help harden an access point against unauthorized entrants- but the limitations of the system make it easy for clever hackers to defeat.

Here at Integrated Axis Technology Group in Arizona, our goal is to help you get the most out of any security technology you choose to deploy. At present, recognizing the cybersecurity risks of Facial Recognition is critical.

The Risks of Facial Recognition Technology

The best FR tech performs Capture, Extraction, Comparison, and Matching very quickly. But for an intruder who understands how the machine works, defeating the system is still possible. There is also a list of known methods to beat FR cameras. They include, but are not limited to;

  • Camera finders: detect FR cameras so they can be avoided
  • NIR LEDs: use bright lights to disrupt FR scans
  • Reflective accessories: blind camera sensors
  • Prosthetic masks: realistic masks that can trick FR cameras
  • Hair and makeup: obscure and alter facial features without looking suspicious

FR Hacking

For the time being, all of these methods allow people to escape detection. But only one can actually fool an FR scanner in order to gain access to a restricted location, the prosthetic mask. While these items are expensive, it is possible for a criminal to obtain them, and they easily fool most FR systems. Of course, privacy is always a concern. By making your face your key and password, that means anyone who manages to obtain a prosthetic copy of your face gains access. In a world where FR is ubiquitous, a rise in prosthetic mask crime is a predictable outcome.

Reliability

Automakers have begun experimenting with FR tech as a means for drivers to access their vehicles. Models that are currently in testing have a high rate of success, about 97%. But these devices succeed at lower rates recognizing women due to makeup and hair changes, and people with dark skin, which absorbs much of the light FR systems need to work.

Privacy

Of course, placing FR cameras anywhere poses a privacy threat to anyone who walks by them. With these concerns on the rise, we can expect to see changes to legislation regulating these devices in the near future.

Here at Integrated Axis, our goal is to help companies in Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona cope with and overcome these risks. Our integrated It services are designed to keep you ahead of the competition- especially in areas where keeping up with bleeding-edge technology is key to remaining competitive in your industry.